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Patient Education



FAQ's   |   Links to Recommended Websites   |   Recommended Health Screenings and Immunizations



Frequently Asked Questions


  1. Should I (or my daughter) get the HPV Vaccine?
  2. What is bioidentical hormone replacement therapy?
  3. What treatment options are available for my heavy menstrual periods?
  4. What is an endometrial ablation?
  5. How can I have my "tubes tied" without an incision or general anesthesia?
  6. What surgery is available for my urinary incontinence?
  7. What new types of contraception are available?
  8. What is PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) and what treatment is available?
  9. What treatments are available for endometriosis?
  10. What is a colposcopy?
  11. What is Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?
  12. Are you at risk for Hereditary Cancer?

1. Should I (or my daughter) get the HPV Vaccine?


Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. Approximately 80% of men and women in the US acquire a HPV infection during their lifetime. Most of the time HPV has no symptoms so people do not know they have it.

There are approximately 40 types of genital HPV. Some types can cause cervical cancer in women and can also cause other kinds of cancer in both men and women. Other types can cause genital warts in both males and females. The HPV vaccine works by preventing the most common types of HPV that cause cervical cancer and genital warts. It is given as a 3-dose vaccine. The vaccine is FDA approved for females ages 9-26.

2. What is bioidentical hormone replacement therapy?


Bioidentical hormones are biochemically similar to those produced by the body or ovaries. The FDA has approved many prescription products that contain bioidentical hormones. However, the term "bioidentical" is often used to refer to custom-compounded hormones. One major difference between FDA-approved prescription bioidentical products and custom-compounded products is that the former are regulated by the FDA and tested for purity, potency, efficacy and safety. Custom-compounded hormones allow for customization of dosing and hormone combinations.

3. What treatment options are available for my heavy menstrual periods?


Excessive or prolonged bleeding with periods is known medically as menorrhagia. Affecting almost 1 in 5 women, menorrhagia is a serious health condition that can have very disruptive effects on your family, your social life, regular daily activities and your mood.

Treatment options available for menorrhagia are varied. Oral contraceptive pills and Lysteda are excellent choices for women of all ages but particularly those still interested in childbearing. Mirena is a progesterone-releasing contraceptive device that provides a 75% reduction in bleeding after 3 months with 20% of women experiencing no periods after one year. NovaSure endometrial ablation is an in-office procedure requiring local anesthesia. After NovaSure, 91% of women experience less bleeding and 41% have no bleeding at all.

4. What is an endometrial ablation?


An endometrial ablation is a minimally invasive outpatient treatment to ablate or destroy the lining of the uterus. The procedure is used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding and is an alternative to hysterectomy and hormone therapies. NovaSure endometrial ablation is performed in the office with local anesthesia and following NovaSure 91% of women experience less bleeding and 41% have no bleeding at all.

5. How can I have my "tubes tied" without an incision or general anesthesia?


Essure Permanent Contraception is a simple, minimally invasive procedure that permanently prevents pregnancy. Performed without anesthesia in an office setting, the Essure procedure involves placing a soft insert into each fallopian tube. Your body's own tissue then grows in and around the inserts to block your tubes.

6. What surgery is available for my urinary incontinence?


Stress urinary incontinence is a condition in which sudden movements put stress on the bladder, causing urine to leak out involuntarily. While there are several types of incontinence, stress urinary incontinence is the most common, affecting 1 in 3 women, many of them after childbirth.

Tension-free vaginal tape or TVT is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that involves placing a ribbon-like strip of mesh, under the urethra to provide support whenever you stress this area, such as during a cough or sneeze. More than 90% of women after treatment with TVT have no or significantly less urinary leakage when questioned more than 10 years after the procedure.

7. What new types of contraception are available?


In addition to hormonal contraceptive options such as oral contraceptive pills, the contraceptive ring (NuvaRing) and a contraceptive injection (Depo-Provera), longer acting reversible methods of contraception are available. Mirena is an intrauterine contraceptive device that provides 5 years of contraception as well as lighter periods in 75% of women and no periods in 20% of women. Nexplanon is a flexible plastic rod the size of a matchstick that is put under the skin of your arm and it provides contraceptive protection for 3 years. For those women who have completed childbearing, Essure is a minimally invasive office procedure that permanently prevents pregnancy.

8. What is PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) and what treatment is available?


Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common female endocrine disorder, affecting approximately 5%-10% of all females. The principal features are obesity, irregular or no periods due to lack of ovulation, acne and excessive amounts or effects of androgenic (masculinizing) hormones. Treatment options include oral contraceptive pills, medication to reduce excess hair growth, medication typically use to treat diabetes, fertility medications to stimulate ovulation, and weight loss surgery in the morbidly obese patient.

9. What treatments are available for endometriosis?


Endometriosis is when the tissue lining the uterus (known as endometrium) is found outside the uterus. Common symptoms include pain with periods, pain with sex, painful urination or painful bowel movements during periods, and infertility. Treatment options include hormone therapy with oral contraceptive pills, progesterone and GnRH agonists (DepoLupron); pain medications; and surgical intervention. Conservative surgery to cauterize or remove endometrial implants can be done with laparoscopy with or without the aid of the da Vinci® robot.

10. What is a colposcopy?


Colposcopy is a way for your doctor to use a special magnifying device to look at your cervix, vagina and vulva. The procedure is usually done when the result of a Pap test is abnormal. If a problem is seen during colposcopy, a small sample of tissue (biopsy) may be taken from the cervix or from inside the opening of the cervix (endocervical canal). The sample is looked at under a microscope by the pathologist to determine the extent of the abnormality.

11. What is Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?


Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the name of a condition in women where the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina is disrupted and replaced by an overgrowth of less favorable bacteria. Women with BV may have an abnormal vaginal discharge with an unpleasant or fish-like odor. Discharge, if present, is usually white or gray and often thin. Women with BV may also have burning during urination or itching around the outside of the vagina, or both. However, most women with BV report no signs or symptoms at all. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in women of childbearing age. Antibiotics by mouth or an antibiotic vaginal gel are the standard treatments for BV.

12. Are you at risk for Hereditary Cancer?


Take a Cancer Screen Quiz & Customize your Family Background. https://www.hereditarycancerquiz.com/awomanspla and https://fht.myriad.com/awomanspla

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Links to Recommended Websites


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Recommended Health Screenings and Immunizations



Ages13-2021-3940-6465 and older
Exam
  • Physical Exam
  • (Pelvic exam only if sexually active or medical issue)
  • Physical exam
  • Physical exam
  • Mammogram
  • Colonoscopy every 10 years starting at age 50
  • DEXA (every 2 years after menopause)
  • Physical Exam
  • Mammogram
  • Colonoscopy (every 10 years)
  • DEXA (every 2 years)
  • Daily Aspirin 81mg
Labs/Tests
  • Chlamydia, gonorrhea testing (if sexually active)
  • PAP smear
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • HIV
  • With risk factors: Lipid, glucose and anemia
  • PAP smear (If also negative HPV, can do every 3 years)
  • Fasting glucose (every 3 years after 45)
  • Lipid Panel, TSH (every 5 years after 45)
  • PAP smear (If also negative HPV can do every 3 years)
  • Fasting glucose (every 3 years)
  • Lipid Panel, TSH (every 5 years)
Vaccines
MMRIf not rubella immune
TdAPOnce between 11-18Tetanus booster every 10 years after initial TdAP. Pertussis coverage recommended for all caregivers with young children.
HPVOne series (3 shots) age 9-26
InfluenzaeAnnuallyAnnuallyAnnuallyAnnually
Hepatitis A/BIf not given previously and at risk of exposureIf not given previously and at risk of exposureIf not given previously and at risk of exposureIf not given previously and at risk of exposure
VaricellaIf not given previously and if no evidence of immunity
MeningococalOnce before high school entry
Herpes Zoster (shingles)Single dose after age 60Single dose after age 60
PneumococcalSingle dose for adults with risk factors

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